Posts Tagged With: motown writers network

Support @Boys2Books, Metro #Detroit Afterschool Literacy Initiative #michlit #mwn #MotownLit

boystobooks

The program focuses on improving the lives of young males through literacy, leadership, and life skills. The program has been receiving local and national attention via BET, PBS, and other media sources.  Boys2Books1

For more info. about Boys 2 Books visit: http://www.eddieconnor.com/boys2books or call 313.469.1947

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Motown Writers Network Featured Author ~ Jean Scheffler

MeThis week’s featured author, Jean Scheffler grew up “South of Detroit”  and as a child she would sit on her Grandfathers lap at his summer cottage and intently listen to stories of his childhood adventures in early industrial Detroit. As he rocked her in front of the roaring fire, her love for Detroit’s history and its exciting past took root.

The Sugar House, Jean’s literary debut is a step back in time. Join us as we get to know more about Jean and her new historical fiction.

 

Where are you from?

I am from Trenton, MI ( Just 20 Miles south of Detroit)

 

Tell us your latest news?

I published my first novel “The Sugar House” in February.

 

When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing three years ago following months (actually years) of research of the history of Detroit.

 

What inspired you to write your first book?

I was going through a transition in my life and I looked around and noticed my children were getting older and knew there were many things that I wanted to accomplish that I had not begun. The first was to write a novel. I had had the idea for “The Sugar House” for a year or so and had been developing it in my thoughts. I decided that it was the time to set aside other things and pursue my dream as an author.

I always wanted to become a writer but life had always seemed to get in the way. Or perhaps I did not make it enough of a priority. Or perhaps I did not have the confidence. Perhaps I just needed the right story.  I had tried once before but the story fell apart as I tried to put it down.  When I decided to really sit down and write “The Sugar House’ I knew I had a great story and an important one. Actually, sometimes I say the story wrote itself. I loved the story so much I was truly worried that I was not worthy enough of writing it. In that I mean that I was a first time writer and I wanted to give value and grace to such an important part of history.

 

Do you have a specific writing style?

I’m not quite sure of the categories of writing styles. I write from research and stories and imagination. I like to piece together articles, pieces of stories, historical facts and things that I have experienced or watched my children experience to make a relatable story.

 

How did you come up with the title?

The name “The Sugar House” initially came from the gangster portion of the story. The Purple Gang was originally called the Oakland Sugar House gang. But as the novel developed I saw that it represented many other aspects of the character, Joe’s life.

 

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

The main message I want the reader to grasp from my novel is that a person can be stay true to themselves and their faith even faced with great adversity.  While no person is perfect and my break the rules or laws at times they can find their way to a happy, content life in the end if they remember what is important.

 

Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The book is historical fiction. That is a broad title that encompasses many types of work. “The Sugar House” is a historical fiction in the strictest sense of the word.  Dates and events that are historically documented are almost all true down to the day.  Many names of the Purple Gang leaders are their actual names.  Many events that involved the Purple Gang are documented as factual.  The story in fact is based on things my grandfather told me occurred in his life. Not all the events that occur in The Sugar House are factual but many are. I tried to create a story that the reader would be able to learn from and at the same time enjoy as a fictional novel.

 

What books have most influenced your life most?

The Little House on the Prairie books were the first influential books of my childhood. I read them over and over again- fascinated by the hardships the Ingalls family dealt with but how their adventurous spirit helped drive them ahead.   Gone with the Wind was my go to book as a teen. Also Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. Looking back I guess I have always had a love for great characters who live in a different time and face different adversities but reach within themselves to find a higher ground.

 

What book are you reading now?

I am currently reading several novels by new authors. I am trying my hand in reviewing books to further my abilities as a writer and give back to the writing community.

 

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

My current novel is based on my maternal grandfather who was a railroad conductor before the Depression.

 

Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

I have several very good girlfriends who supported my throughout the project. They were always encouraging and are very much the cheerleaders that every first time author should have. I am blessed to have them in my life.

 

Do you see writing as a career?

I would love to make writing a career. I want to be able to tell stories that people will enjoy and learn from at the same time. Perhaps change their perspectives or lives a little.

 

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

If I had to do it all over again I would not change anything about my novel (Except my not procrastinate as long as I did)

 

Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

As “The Sugar House” is based in Detroit I only had to travel to the city for my research. (I did go to Windsor once for a Prohibition Whisky Tour) My next novel takes place from Michigan to Kansas so I anticipate more travel with that one.

 

Who designed the covers?

I hired a wonderful woman named Karrie Ross from California to design the cover and do the interior design of the novel. The photograph is actually a close up of the suit my grandfather is wearing in the picture on the back cover.

 

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

I think the hardest part of writing is two fold. One- finding the inspiration and the time at the same time can be very difficult in a hectic life with children.  Two- once the story is written- having others read your inner thoughts and ideas and judge them.

 

Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned a lot from writing my book. I learned so much Detroit history. I learned a lot about the people who made this city Great. I learned a lot about myself, about where I come from and who I am. I know it sounds a little deep but after taking years to research my ancestors, the country they came from, their daily habits, their rituals etc., I think I would only be remiss if I had not learned a whole lot about what it means to be me.

 

Do you have any advice for other writers?

I can not give advice to established writers and this is my first novel however I think that may qualify my to give advice to new and want to be writers.  Once you find the story you want to tell- be confident and tell it.  Don’t worry about what others will say. The ones who judge harshly are the ones who will never leave their mark as you will.

 

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

I hope my readers enjoy “The Sugar House” and learn something about the great city of Detroit. I hope it motivates them to look into the past and see what their own ancestors did to make it in America. And I hope it  inspires them to save the historical parts of Detroit for themselves and to continue to improve Detroit for future generations.

 

The Sugar House

Jean Scheffler

“The Sugar House”

http://www.jeanscheffler.com

Amazon link: http://goo.gl/9GNYvy

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/TheSugarHouseDetroit

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JeanScheff

 

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Support @Boys2Books, Metro #Detroit Afterschool Literacy Initiative #michlit #mwn #MotownLit

boystobooks

The program focuses on improving the lives of young males through literacy, leadership, and life skills. The program has been receiving local and national attention via BET, PBS, and other media sources.  Boys2Books1

For more info. about Boys 2 Books visit: http://www.eddieconnor.com/boys2books or call 313.469.1947

 

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Motown Writers Network Author Feature~Victor ‘Billione’ Walker

Billione This week’s featured author is no stranger to the limelight, so shining a light on him is something he’s used to! A singer, poet and author, Billione (pronounced bil-LEE-yon) is one of Detroit’s most up and coming people to keep an eye on. He is the author of several books, including his most recent poetic play the Birth of Mars, and No Tea. No Shade, a novel set in Detroit. His thought provoking work touches on various subjects related to being a Detroit native, LGBT experiences and examining masculinity.

Come and experience the gifted one, Billione, as we talk to him about his work!

Where are you from?

I was born and raised in Detroit. Most of my writing is pulled from my experiences as a Detroiter.
Tell us your latest news?

I recently released my first work of fiction entitled No Tea. No Shade. Set in Detroit, it is a story about the dapper, charismatic Chauncey King, a successful Editor-in-chief of the Detroit Daily News. Chauncey goes from reporting the news to being the center of his own scandal after coming face-to-face with his turbulent past. His life seems to unravel until he meets Malcolm Dandridge at a local bathhouse and realizes that in order to be happy he must first face his biggest fear.
When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing song lyrics as a child. My mother kept a journal and I would read the words she wrote and sing them. What she wrote sounded like love songs, full of joy and pain.
Other forms of my writing emerged out of my love for reading. As I child, I read books about a number of things but struggled to find characters that were similar to me. After writing song lyrics, I eventually wrote poetry and eventually fiction.

 

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I first considered myself a writer when I began writing news in the Mumford High School newspaper. I didn’t particularly like writing news; my Journalism teacher convinced me that I was good at it. So, I stuck with it. When I went home, though, I secretly wrote song lyrics and poems.
What inspired you to write your first book?

After meeting one of my favorite authors, the late E. Lynn Harris, I mentioned to him how his characters resonated with me, and his writing inspired me to write my own novel. He told me to be sure to send it to him when I did. After getting news of his passing in 2009, I remembered how I never started working on my novel. Remembering that meeting, I began taking notes on ‘No Tea. No Shade,” and dedicated it to Lynn.
Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t know if I have a defined writing style, but I simply write about what I know: Detroit, being Black and gay. It is important to me to stay in my lane and offer my readers an authentic experience.
How did you come up with the title?

The title No Tea. No Shade. is a common phrase in the gay community said when you want to tell someone the truth without offending them. I heard RuPaul say it frequently on RuPaul’s Drag Race and knew it reflected the circumstances of the book.
Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Our lives are best spent coming to terms with who we are, building authentic relationships and getting our own truths. Life is too short to be spent trying to please others. When we face our darkest fears, it will be then that we can truly deserve to live in the light.
How much of the book is realistic?

Every character in No Tea. No Shade. has elements pulled directly from my life. Of course, there are some elements that are made more dramatic to enhance the reader’s experience, but it’s all realistic and quite autobiographical.
Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I pulled from everything I know: Personal experiences, things I’ve heard about and things I never read about but wanted to. No Tea. No Shade. is the type of book I would read.
What books have most influenced your life most?

Books like Ishmael by Daniel Quinn, The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho and Their Eyes Were Watching Godare among my favorite books and have helped shape my personal philosophy.  I have also been influenced by authors like George Orwell, Alice Walker, Ntozake Shange, and Toni Morrison.
If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I consider Sylvia Hubbard a mentor. She has helped me go from a poet with a desire to self-publish to an author with multiple titles under my belt. I learned almost everything I know about independent publishing from her and the Motown Writers Network. I am sincerely grateful for the guidance and support I’ve received.
What book are you reading now?

I am currently reading an anthology of coming out stories entitled Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, edited by Derrick Tennial out of Atlanta. I contributed a story entitled Thirty-Eight, about my coming out as gay and how the messages I received through television as a child of the 80’s shaped my identity as a man.
Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I am inspired by a number of new authors, especially those writing poetry. Poets like Joel Fluent Greene of Detroit’s Café Mahogany days is releasing his first book of poetry this month. I am excited to celebrate him and read his new work. Also, Detroit poet T. Miller released a book called Coming Out Of Nowhere that took conversations that happened on social media to a different level.
What are your current projects?

I am currently preparing to bring my poetic play entitled The Birth of Mars to the stage. It was inspired by For Colored Girls by Ntozake Shange and the Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler. Mars took 6 years to write and examines masculinity in America.
Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Being a poet and having the opportunity to perform in Detroit has connected me to so many people. The artist community has been so supportive and encouraging. People like Dimonique Boyd, Crystal Campbell, jessica Care moore, Legacy Leonard, LaShaun Phoenix Moore, Omari King Wise, Kalimah Johnson and so many more have supported me as a poet and fiction writer.
Do you see writing as a career?

From the response No Tea. No Shade. has gotten, I could definitely see that happening. I love writing and enjoy the process of bringing characters to life. It isn’t easy crafting a story that makes sense, but when it’s all over, I feel accomplished and successful.
If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Not one thing! I love my characters and the story. Well, maybe one thing… I would make it longer. The story is short, but gripping.
Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

My interest for writing grew out of reading. My grandmother was an avid reader and it rubbed off on me.
Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I am currently finishing up my sixth book of poetry entitled Grand Boulevard. It is mainly about my experiences as a Detroiter. I dedicated it to the late, great Detroit poet Blair.
Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I am the king of the comma! For some reason, commas end up randomly in my writing, in places I am not so sure they belong. That’s what good editors are for!
Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

E. Lynn Harris and Alice Walker are among my favorite authors. Their books resonate with me because they require me to face my fears related to being Black, gay and an artist. They also have the best characters!
Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I travel frequently for my books, whether to perform poetry or to discuss some of the themes in them. Sometimes other people make connections in my writing that never even occurred to me.
Who designed the covers?

I designed all of the covers for my books. I am interested in having someone else design the covers for my future publications.
What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The most difficult part of writing books has been keeping track of the storylines and making sure they don’t conflict with each other.
Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned that the process of writing novels takes time and cannot be rushed. Creativity in any form should not be rushed.
Do you have any advice for other writers?

Observe people in their environments. Find out how people move, speak and interact. I did a lot of people watching in public places for No Tea. No Shade. The descriptions in the book are real. If you go to where my characters are and do the things they do, you will see exactly what they see.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Yes. Thank you for joining me on this journey and for supporting all of the stories and words that emerge from my mind.

No Tea No Shade

Billione

No Tea. No Shade.

getBillione.com

amazon.com/author/billione

amazon.com/No-Tea-Shade-Billione-ebook/dp/B00E332LZW

facebook.com/getBillione

twitter.com/Billione

Centric

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Support @Boys2Books, Metro #Detroit Afterschool Literacy Initiative #michlit #mwn #MotownLit

boystobooks

The program focuses on improving the lives of young males through literacy, leadership, and life skills. The program has been receiving local and national attention via BET, PBS, and other media sources.  Boys2Books1

For more info. about Boys 2 Books visit: http://www.eddieconnor.com/boys2books or call 313.469.1947

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Motown Writers Network Author Feature~Christopher Broom


Christopher Broom
Author – Christopher R. Broom

Where are you from?

I was born and raised in Southern California and currently make my home in Midland Michigan.

 

Tell us your latest news:

I’m currently working on my first science fiction dystopic novel entitled Pulse.  It centers around a young woman who is coming to grips with frightening new powers in a world who enslaves her kind.  Together with two companions she sets out to obtain her freedom and the freedom of those afflicted with the Pulse.

 

When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing at a very early age…around seven or so.  I actually started out writing very horrible fan fiction in the Dragonlance universe.  I was just enraptured with the fantastical stories set in the Dragonlance world and I wanted to be a part of that.  As I got older I began creating my own worlds of fantastical design and I’ve never looked back.

 

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

That’s a really good question. I suppose I don’t really consider myself a writer, at least not in the traditional sense.  I am however a person who enjoys writing.  But if I had to nail down a time frame I would say my first year of college when I impressed my Creative Writing Professor was the first time I really considered myself a writer.

 

What inspired you to write your first book?

During college I began to gravitate towards short fiction and after trying my hand at it I found a great connection with the genre and the style.  While it may not be a “book” my first piece of published writing is “Deeper Down the Hole”, a short story focusing on a man named Lyle who is forced to come to terms with being responsible for putting his teenage daughter into a coma.

 

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t believe so.  I think each story demands a different style and once I begin I just go along for the ride.

 

How did you come up with the title?

When I first began drafting what would become Pulse I had no idea what to call it.  One night while lying in bed with my wife we were talking about different titles and finally she told me to just be simple and call the book what it is.  After that the light bulb switched on in my head and I knew what the title had to be.

 

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

If there’s a moral or a message in Pulse I think it would be a rallying cry against discrimination.  The tone might not be prevalent or obvious but I think it’s there especially when you consider the consequences of severe discrimination.

 

How much of your book is realistic?

Maybe a little of it is realistic.  I think the general tone of the book can be read in a way that it can mirror real world problems but it’s done in an otherworldly sort of way.

 

Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

No not really although some of the characters in Pulse mirror some very close people in my life.

 

 What books have most influenced your life most?

I’m greatly influenced by the works of R.A. Salvatore, Margaret Weiss and Tracey Hickman, Jean Rabe, Ray Bradbury, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Aldous Huxley, Kurt Vonnegut and Ralph Ellison to name a few.  While it’s extremely difficult to name certain books that have influenced me I feel these authors and their collected works have had an enormous impact on me.

 

 If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I would choose R.A. Salvatore.  The way he writes about his characters is amazing and I would love to know how he does it.

 

What book are you reading now?

I’m currently reading “The Companions” by R.A. Salvatore as well as “Looking for Calvin and Hobbes – A Biography of Bill Watterson.”

 

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

It’s been fairly hard to keep up with new authors as there are so many but I’m always looking for new works by Jeff Vande Zande.

 

What are your current projects?

A lot of my time is spent working on Pulse and shaping the world it’s set in.  I’m also working on a collection of short stories entitled “The Deepest Part of Me.”

 

Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Outside of family I haven’t really had a lot of support.  My wife of course has always supported me but if there was one person I could count on for any kind of support it would be fellow Michigan author Robin Devereaux-Nelson.

 

Do you see writing as a career?

Isn’t that what we all want?  I would love to be a career writer but I don’t ever see it happening for me.  For now I’m just happy to write and publish what I can.  If a handful of people are the only ones enjoying what I’ve created than that’s good enough for me.

 

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

The one thing that I learned is that research is important!  I think I went through fifteen to twenty drafts of Pulse before I even had a clear vision of what the setting was.  So if I could go back and change anything it would be to do some research first and have a solid setting in place before anything else.

 

Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I used writing as an escape.  In reality I lived in a one bedroom apartment in the middle of the Mojave desert with my mother and her then live-in boyfriend.  When I couldn’t get away from it all I would sit in front of a stack of paper and I would write my way to a better life.

 

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Absolutely,

“We’re almost to the top boy, ya ready?”

Cale nodded and tapped the two bottles of water that hung on his hip.

Dalen huffed and spread his thin lips into a smile.

He was handsome once Cale noted.  He had strong cheekbones and a square jaw.  His body was muscular but not overly large, his arms and chest filled out his vest.  His face was that of a hardened survivor however.  His eyes sat deep into his skull and any life they once held was long gone.  His face was rough and marred with so many scars Cale couldn’t count them all.  It was his hands however that always caught Cale’s gaze growing up.  His fingers which should have been straight were gnarled and twisted.  The skin which should have been rough only from aging had been torn apart and stitched back together so often Cale often wondered if it was actually human skin that covered his father’s hands or something else entirely.

The rumbling of the tracks began to smooth out, a sure sign they were nearing the top as the Primary’s always took better care of the tracks the closer the tracks were to the surface.

            Dalen stood and braced himself between the wall of the boxcar and the stack of crates and Cale did the same.  The routine never changed it seemed.  One….two….three….large bumps as the train passed over the tracks leading from the Bowels to the surface always threw everything that wasn’t securely fastened down around and on more than one occasion Cale suffered for not heeding his father’s warning.  When everything settled back into place Dalen and his son resumed their seats as Dalen pulled out a small piece of cloth that had been rolled and tied neatly.  A gift from their friends he had told Cale before they left their home earlier in the day.  Cale had never been fond of his father’s ‘friends’ but he did have to admit they knew exactly where to hit.

 

Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Having to create an entire world is very taxing.  While I could take the lazy-mans route and just throw together a bunch of stuff and call it a world I prefer to create a world that seems plausible.  So from religions to the economy to jobs to social issues and everything in between I want the world of Pulse to feel alive and that takes a lot of work.

 

Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

My favorite author is R.A. Salvatore without a doubt.  What I love about his work is how he handles his characters especially his sole creation of Drizzt Do’Urden.  That character is so multifaceted that I can read book after book about him and always discover a new side to him that I hadn’t known before.  It’s inspiring.

 

Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not yet but maybe someday.

 

Who designed the covers?

There is currently no artwork for Pulse but I’m always looking for artists who can bring Pulse to life in a visual way.

 

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

I think one of the challenges of writing Pulse is getting the tone down.  It’s  very easy to take a book into an entirely new direction without even realizing it.

 

Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I gained a whole new respect for new and established authors who have already finished their novels.  It always seems that I’ll never finish but when I see others doing it I know I just have to keep my nose to the grindstone and get it done.

 

Do you have any advice for other writers?

To just keep writing and never stop; if you run into a block just write your way out of it even if it comes off as clumsy, you can always change it during rewrites and editing.

 

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for your support, it means everything to me especially on those long nights when I’ve only got the light of my computer screen and a warm cup of coffee to keep me company.

 

Deeper

Dominant Recessive
Facebook Authors Page – Christopher Broom
Click here to read an excerpt from Pulse on Goodreads!
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Unwrap the Gift in you by Eddie Connor

eddieconnorbookDuring this holiday season, while you’re out shopping for everyone else, be sure to invest in yourself. Pick up Eddie’s NEW book, “Unwrap The Gift In YOU!” being released this Tuesday, December 3rd, in stores and online.

You can pre-order a personal signed copy of Eddie’s book “Unwrap The Gift In YOU!” with a personal message included. Pre-order your copy NOW at http://www.eddieconnor.com
Here’s what you can expect from Eddie’s NEW book:
Includes:
• Steps to unlock your potential.
• Tips to activate your gifts within.
• How to maintain health, hope, and happiness during the holidays.
• Eddie’s personal story of overcoming stage 4 cancer.
• Strategies for success.
• Birthing your gifts within.
• Maximizing your purpose.
EDDIE CONNOR is an author and international speaker from Detroit, Michigan. He empowers people to overcome obstacles and walk in their unique purpose, by sharing his testimony as a survivor of stage 4 cancer. Connor is the founder of Boys 2 Books, which provides mentorship to young males via literacy, leadership, and life skill enrichment. Eddie Connor and the was nationally featured in the BET Documentary, “It Takes A Village to Raise Detroit.” He speaks extensively on the subjects of leadership, overcoming obstacles, and maximizing your purpose. Much of his work extends throughout Jamaica and South Africa. His other books include Purposefully Prepared to Persevere, Collections of Reflections, Volumes 1-3: Symphonies of Strength, and E.CON the ICON: from Pop Culture to President Barack Obama.
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Are you on Twitter? Are you a member of Motown Writers Network? Friend me at @sylviahubbard1 #mwn #motownlit #detroit

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http://twitter.com/sylviahubbard1I’m preparing to put together a daily paper on my twitter with all my Motown Writers Network Members

I would appreciate if you could please friend me and let me know you receive the newsletter and are a member of Motown Writers Network, so I may make your tweets apart of the newspaper automatically.

Now follow the birdie and follow me!! See you online!!

http://twitter.com/sylviahubbard1

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Sylvia Hubbard
Author, Blogger and Founder of Motown Writers Network & The African American Electronic Literary Network

Author of Romance & Suspense and Internet Marketing for Writers & Business

NOW AVAILABLE: Secrets, Lies and Family Ties order your copy now
Coming Soon: Tanner’s Devil www.redrosepublishing.com
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Support @Boys2Books, Metro #Detroit Afterschool Literacy Initiative #michlit #mwn #MotownLit

 

boystobooks

The program focuses on improving the lives of young males through literacy, leadership, and life skills. The program has been receiving local and national attention via BET, PBS, and other media sources.  Boys2Books1

For more info. about Boys 2 Books visit: http://www.eddieconnor.com/boys2books or call 313.469.1947

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#MotownLit #PubU #Detroit WCCCD-NW campus.Earn Credits while learning to Publish! #MWN

It’s been years in the making. One of my goals as founder of Motown Writers Network was to have a school where people can go to get education about publishing their work independently.

In collaboration with Wayne County Community College Northwest Campus, I’m proud to say Motown Writers will now be able to offer courses in Writing, Publishing and Marketing. I’m awesomely excited about this opportunity to be able to teach, but also be able to offer college credit to my participants. Continue reading

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Missed the 2013 Motownlit Conference

If you missed the 2013 Motownlit conference download the resource conference booklet now:

http://writersample.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/eom2013booklet2.pdf

 

Mwn2013frtcvr

 

Or click below:

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@Boys2Books featured in National Spotlight!

Boys2Books1I’m honored to be a contributor to the Motown Writers Network and share about my program, Boys 2 Books.

The program focuses on improving the lives of young males through literacy, leadership, and life skills. The program has been receiving local and national attention via BET, PBS, and other media sources. Read the feature on Boys 2 Books in C&G News, focusing on the work being done to inspire our youth! —-> http://bit.ly/HbbQlQ and check out our feature “It Takes a Village to Raise Detroit” on BET —> http://bit.ly/1czdF6W

For more info. about Boys 2 Books visit: http://www.eddieconnor.com/boys2books or call 313.469.1947

 

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Are you on Twitter? Are you a member of Motown Writers Network? Friend me at @sylviahubbard1 #mwn #motownlit #detroit

http://motownwriters.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/de2b5-twitter_bird_follow_me__small__bigger.jpg?w=470
http://twitter.com/sylviahubbard1I’m preparing to put together a daily paper on my twitter with all my Motown Writers Network Members

I would appreciate if you could please friend me and let me know you receive the newsletter and are a member of Motown Writers Network, so I may make your tweets apart of the newspaper automatically.

Now follow the birdie and follow me!! See you online!!

http://twitter.com/sylviahubbard1

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Sylvia Hubbard
Author, Blogger and Founder of Motown Writers Network & The African American Electronic Literary Network

Author of Romance & Suspense and Internet Marketing for Writers & Business

NOW AVAILABLE: Secrets, Lies and Family Ties order your copy now
Coming Soon: Tanner’s Devil www.redrosepublishing.com
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Are you on Twitter? Are you a member of Motown Writers Network? Friend me at @sylviahubbard1 #mwn #motownlit #detroit

http://motownwriters.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/de2b5-twitter_bird_follow_me__small__bigger.jpg?w=470
http://twitter.com/sylviahubbard1I’m preparing to put together a daily paper on my twitter with all my Motown Writers Network Members

I would appreciate if you could please friend me and let me know you receive the newsletter and are a member of Motown Writers Network, so I may make your tweets apart of the newspaper automatically.

Now follow the birdie and follow me!! See you online!!

http://twitter.com/sylviahubbard1

http://motownwriters.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/de2b5-twitter_bird_follow_me__small__bigger.jpg?w=470

Sylvia Hubbard
Author, Blogger and Founder of Motown Writers Network & The African American Electronic Literary Network

Author of Romance & Suspense and Internet Marketing for Writers & Business

NOW AVAILABLE: Secrets, Lies and Family Ties order your copy now
Coming Soon: Tanner’s Devil www.redrosepublishing.com
http://sylviahubbard.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/fanpage.jpg?w=470
icon3.pngicon2.png
youtubeJIA1.png

blogbanner.jpg

 

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Author Spotlight~ Jossie Marie Solheim

This week’s spotlight is on author Jossie Marie Solheim. Join us as we talk with her about her first novel Insane Reno and more.

Where are you from?
Well, originally I am from Kent; but I have lived most of my life in
Cornwall. I love Cornwall and have been so lucky to grow up here and,
although Kent is lovely, too and I enjoyed my time living there in my
teens, Cornwall will always be the place I love best.

Tell us your latest news?

Ha-ha! Well, that would be my first novel, Insane Reno, being
published. It is truly some of the best news I have ever had and a
dream come true.

When and why did you begin writing?

Oh, I started writing when I was around nine years old. My childhood
wasn’t the best, you see, and it was my way of escaping reality. I
would write myself into happy stories with happy endings and pray that
they would come true. Well, they didn’t, when I was young, but the
last few years, more and more of them are coming true; perhaps, not
quite how I imagined them, but I am enjoying the discovery process, so
I don’t mind, too much.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Well, I have called myself a writer for a long time; but honestly, it
wasn’t until I got my publishing deal for my novel that I really felt
I had made it as a writer. For me the short stories and articles I had
published just weren’t enough, it had to be a novel.

What inspired you to write your first book?

So many things. Bodmin moor was one of my biggest inspirations. It
just held a fascination for me that just had to be explored and
understood. I read everything I could get my hands on, regarding the
moors and its myths and grew, ever more fascinated. If you spend a lot
of time there, you’ll understand what I mean. I guess they just spoke
to me, because they felt isolated, lost, and alone; things I had felt
a lot in my own life.
People also were a big inspiration. I had observed different types of
people for so long and examined human nature and I just longed to play
around with that, especially secrets and lies. I guess I experienced a
lot of secrets and lies growing up and longed for the truth to come
out. Well, I never achieved that with my own mysteries, so I wanted
Tizzy to succeed, where I had failed. That goes back to my childhood
days of writing a better outcome, I suppose; however, Tizzy is nothing
like me, she’s a far tougher cookie than I am.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I don’t think so. I tend to adapt and change and like to try different
approaches. For me, writing is an exploration. I want to play around
and dabble with different styles, because I feel that, what works for
one book, may not work so well for another.

How did you come up with the title?

Well, I think the title, more likely, came up with me; just, one day,
I got Insane Reno in my head and it would not go away and I just knew
I had to write a book with that title. I had no idea what or how it
would work at the time, but it all came together, in the end. I think
it was made to be. Perhaps, it was God giving me a helping hand and
setting the wheels in motion. Whatever the case, it’s a title I have
loved from the start and I’m sure I’ll always love.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Yes, kids are smarter than you give them credit for. No matter what
you try to hide from them, they see things; notice subtle signs that
something is wrong. All you do, when you hide the bad news is make
them search for it. Honesty is always the best policy, because bad
news, broken gently, in a well thought out way, is better than bad
news discovered alone or from an uncaring source.

How much of the book is realistic?

Well, the settings are real. Bodmin moor and Bude are both real life
places and Charlotte Dymond was a girl who really was murdered on the
moors and yes, people really do visit her memorial on the anniversary
of her death, in hopes of seeing her ghost. My husband and I try to
go, most years. It’s great fun and a little bit spooky, too.
Smuggling, too was common in the area. The Jamaica Inn, on the moors,
itself, is testament to that. So, I guess you could say it’s fiction
surrounded by a few snippets of reality.

Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Well, there are a lot of my own feelings and experiences fictionalised
in the book, but I think that is true of most books; however, the
story itself comes from my vivid imagination and my characters
occasional shoves, when I am being a bit blind.

What books have most influenced your life?

I guess books that were filled with tragedy, heartache, fear,
struggle, and hope; because that was something I related to and, in
the case of hope, longed for.
Flowers in the Attic, by Virginia Andrews really spoke to me; because,
like those children, I felt abandoned, lost, and alone, and Junk, by
Melvin Burgess, too, for similar reasons. I also devoured anything
about animals, because I longed to work with animals, at that time.

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Virginia Andrews and Daphne De Maurier, because their characters are
so vivid, they’re not afraid to be blunt, and they deal with topics
that some people would have shyed away from. I think it’s important to
deal with difficult subjects; to let other people know that they are
not alone, to give them a sense that there are other people facing
similar situations or feeling the same way as they are. That’s what
books did for me, when I was younger, and they also gave me hope that
things could get better.

What book are you reading now?

I’m currently reading a couple of good books; the first is The day I
died, by Polly Courtney, which is a really intriguing read that isn’t
what you’d expect, and the second is Patrick Patterson, by James
Fryer, which is very interesting and is keeping me very absorbed. It
also happens to be published by Raven Crest Books, the very publisher,
who has made my own dream come true by publishing Insane Reno.

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

Absolutely, I love discovering new authors; that’s part of why I love
my Kindle, so much. Someone who has really got me hooked is Karen
Amanda Hooper. Her book, Tangled tides, made me feel like a child
again, taking me into a magical world that I longed to be a part of
and leaving me giddy for more.

What are your current projects?

My writing very much depends on what is speaking to me at the time. I
would like to say Annie, which is the prequel to Insane Reno is my
sole focus, right now; but, I actually have three books that I am
working on and with regards to which is published first, well, it
really depends on which one calls to me the most.
Annie is on its way, though and looks at Tizzy’s mum’s story; giving
us even more insight into the farm’s past and helping us to see that
life and its many twist and turns have played a huge part on how Annie
has become. I hope that it will give people a little more
understanding of Annie’s actions and also help them to understand that
we are all human and as such, capable of making mistakes.

Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

My editor, Chuck Jolly; he pushed me, guided me, and encouraged me to
keep going, every step of the way and also helped me to have more
faith in myself. I can’t thank him enough for all of his help.

Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely, it might not make me millions and it may be very hard;
but, it is the only career for me. I couldn’t live without it.

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your
latest book?

There are always things I would change. Even if I did a thousand
re-edits, there would be something I would change. I’m a worrier and
so I would always worry it wasn’t good enough and, thus, always make
changes; it’s just my nature. It took a lot for me to pluck up the
courage to let it head out into the big wide world, but I am glad I
did.

Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

As I said before, it grew out of personal need. It was an escape from
an, at times, less than pleasant reality. I read books and I just
thought; maybe, if I write my own, I can, at least, imagine a better
life. It helped me get through things I probably couldn’t have,
without it.

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Of course. I’m gonna choose something with both Jem and Tizzy in it,
as Jem is such a loveable rogue and is proving very popular with the
ladies:

I could sense Jem’s eyes on me, as I laid the table, so I added a
little extra swing to my hips and bent over a little further than was
necessary, as I set each dish in place.
“Your thong’s showing,” My dad said, making me jump out of my skin, as
he strolled into the kitchen, sniffing the air.
“Something smells good,” he added, dropping into his seat at the far
end of the table and gazing at me, with a wry smile.
“Did I interrupt something?” He asked.
“I dunno, did he?”  Jem said, directing his question at me, as he
beamed like a Cheshire cat.
“No!”  I snapped, mortified.
“Guess not then,” he replied, “must have just been my imagination,
playing tricks on me.”  He added.
“What are you on about?”  I growled.
“Oh nothing, it’s just I could have sworn you were doing your best
model swagger and making and extra point of flashing me you’re…” he
paused, mid-sentence, and looked to my father.
“Thong?”  My father replied, with a laugh.
“Well, I was gonna say cute little butt, but thong works.” He added,
and joined in with my father’s laughter.
“Oh, very funny,” I snarled.  “Anyway, what gave you the right to look?”
“If you wiggle it at me, I’m gonna look.”
“I didn’t frigging wiggle it.” I hissed.
“No, but you wanted to and that counts.”  He replied, the smug smile,
still firmly in place.
“Dad,” I cried, “are you gonna let him get away with that?”  I said,
knowing instantly what his reply would be.
“Hey, you were flashing him your thong, so you can fight your own battles.”
“So, if I flashed my thong at a stranger and he grabbed my butt,
you’d be ok with that?”  I asked.
“I dunno,” he replied, then leaning back to look at Jem he added.
“Hey Jem, why don’t you try it and see.”
“Dad!”  I cried, quickly dropping onto one of the bench seats as Jem
turned, eyes full of mischief.
“Don’t worry, I’ll get ya later.” He said, rubbing his hand together,
then turned back to the cooker, switched the hob off and scuttled
towards the table, frying pan in hand.

Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Staying focused. I always have so many ideas, that I often jump from
one novel to the next and back again, trying to accommodate all the
characters and ideas that are screaming for release.

Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you
about their work?

Oh, I couldn’t possibly choose just one. There are just so many great
authors out there; however, the one I am really watching at the moment
is Karen Amanda Hooper.

Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not at present. I tend to stick with my local area for settings, that
or other places I have lived; although, there is a book planned for
the future that might require a bit of a road trip, something to
look forward to.

Who designed the covers?

Well, with Insane Reno, it was actually me; I just had such a vivid
idea of what I wanted that it just seemed easier that way, but that
might not always be the case.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Knowing when to let go. As I said before, I’m a worrier and letting
Insane Reno go out into the world was like waving my son off, for his
first day at school, a very emotional and nerve racking experience.

Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I think every book is a learning experience and, as an author, you are
always learning new things; but a big lesson I learned from writing
Insane Reno is to try not to over think things, as it just leads to
unnecessary worry and stress.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Just enjoy what you do and don’t worry, if someone doesn’t like what
you write, because everyone is different. What some people love,
others will hate.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you for taking the time to read my book. Taking the step to
publish is such a scary one and knowing that people are reading and
enjoying it is a great blessing; so, thank you from the bottom of my
heart for taking a chance on Insane Reno. It truly means a lot.

By author Jossie Marie Solheim

Author Website http://jossiesolheim.ravencrestbooks.com/
Amazon Link http://amzn.to/T1kfsB
Facebook Link https://www.facebook.com/jossie.marie
Twitter Link @Jossiemarie84

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