Posts Tagged With: Non-fiction

Anointed Pen 5- Christian Writers Boot Camp- @ACWDetroit

You are invited to attend:

Detroit’s Premiere Christian Writers Literary Alliance presents

 Anointed Pen 5  – Boot Camp for Aspiring Christian Writers

Friday, September 27, 2012 4:00 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, September 28th 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

$90 beginning August 1

On-site Registration and Check In begin 4:00 p.m. Friday and resume Saturday at 8:00 a.m. Friday 5:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Writing Exercises

Story Boarding for Fiction Writers               

Outlining for Non-Fiction Writers An excellent opportunity to:

  • Jump start a new project
  • Get some serious uninterrupted work done on a current project; or
  • Banish the dreaded writer’s block!

Bring your lap top, iPad/tablet, paper and pen, chisel and stone…whatever your writing tools of choice and be prepared to WRITE with reckless abandon! *Electrical outlets available; however you might want to bring your own UL approved heavy duty extension cord - just in case. Saturday 8:00 a.m. On-Site Registration and Check-in Continues 8:30 a.m. Morning Worship 9:00 a.m. Workshops Begin

  • Agents and Traditional Publishing Houses
  • Business for Writers
  • Preparatory Editing
  • Media Training
  • Self Publishing

Plus, a Working Lunch

CLICK HERE TO ATTEND

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Indie Author Chat Branding Basics~Samantha Fury

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Anointed Pen 5 Christian Writers Boot Camp-@ACWDetroit

You are invited to attend:

Detroit’s Premiere Christian Writers Literary Alliance presents

 Anointed Pen 5  – Boot Camp for Aspiring Christian Writers

Friday, September 27, 2012 4:00 p.m. to 9 p.m.
and
Saturday, September 28th 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

$90 beginning August 1

On-site Registration and Check In begin 4:00 p.m. Friday and resume Saturday at 8:00 a.m.
Friday
5:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Writing Exercises

Story Boarding for Fiction Writers               

Outlining for Non-Fiction Writers
An excellent opportunity to:

  • Jump start a new project
  • Get some serious uninterrupted work done on a current project; or
  • Banish the dreaded writer’s block!

Bring your lap top, iPad/tablet, paper and pen, chisel and stone…whatever your writing tools of choice and be prepared to WRITE with reckless abandon!
*Electrical outlets available; however you might want to bring your own UL approved heavy duty extension cord - just in case.

Saturday
8:00 a.m. On-Site Registration and Check-in Continues 8:30 a.m. Morning Worship
9:00 a.m. Workshops Begin

  • Agents and Traditional Publishing Houses
  • Business for Writers
  • Preparatory Editing
  • Media Training
  • Self Publishing

Plus, a Working Lunch

CLICK HERE TO ATTEND

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Literary Genres~Literature

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This Week’s MWN Feature~Laura Lee

 

Metro Detroit native Laura Lee divides her time equally between writing and producing ballet educational tours with her partner, the artistic director of the Russian National Ballet Foundation.  She is the author of more than a dozen non-fiction books with such publishers as Harper Collins, Reader’s Digest, Running Press, Broadway Books, Lyons Press and Black Dog and Leventhal.  Her Pocket Encyclopedia of Aggravation has sold more than 85,000 copies.  She has also written one collection of poetry (Invited to Sound), and a children’s book (A Child’s Introduction to Ballet).  She brings to her writing a unique background as a radio announcer, improvisational comic and one-time professional mime.

The San Francisco Chronicle has said of her work, “Lee’s dry, humorous tone makes her a charming companion… She has a penchant for wordplay that is irresistible.”

Angel is her first novel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Questions with Laura:

Where are you from?

I live in Rochester Hills.

Tell us your latest news?

I am promoting my debut novel, Angel. I have a non-fiction book with Reader’s Digest coming out in the near future.

When and why did you begin writing?

I started writing as a child and published my first article at the age of 12. It was called “My first day of junior high school.” My
father was a writer and insisted I was a “born writer” but it didn’t occur to me until much later that writing was a special skill.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

There was a series of little things. My father pushed me in that direction– he suggested I write about junior high and submit the
article, for example. I wanted to be an actress and majored in theater in college. I never got cast in anything, and in my senior year, when I auditioned my last time and failed to be cast, I took my anger and frustration and turned it into a one act comedy, which a
group of students performed and I got great feedback for it. Realizing acting was not going to be my calling, I went to broadcast
school to become a radio announcer. As the other students struggled to write ads and news copy, I whipped them off and got praise. I
started to get the idea that I could do something maybe everyone else didn’t find easy. I started writing articles for local papers in a
half-hearted way when I worked in radio, encouraged by my father. It wasn’t until I burnt out on radio that I started taking the writing
seriously. I got a job at the Times Union in Albany, NY as a reporter and feature writer beginning as a temp, filling in for someone on
maternity leave. I had no formal training in journalism or writing and was hired on the strength of my clips. It was great training in
writing quickly and not waiting for the muse or to get your artistic thing together. I published my first book while working at the paper,
and I didn’t look back from that point on. Now I’ve written 14 books, both non-fiction and fiction.
What inspired you to write your first book?

I wouldn’t call my first book particularly “inspired.” I mentioned in passing to my father that I thought it would be interesting to
write a book about the real people behind familiar names like Sears, shrapnel, Chef Boyardee and so on. He didn’t let it go until I’d
produced a proposal and some sample chapters and sent them off to everybody using Writer’s Market. I was surprised when I got a call
from a publisher that wanted me to write it.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I am focused on fiction now, and would like that to be my future direction. What works for me in fiction is to start with some sort of archetypal image and to relate it to the specifics of a character in a certain setting and situation. I have a recognizable voice, I think,
in my humorous non-fiction. Now I’ve only published one novel, but I have two more that I’ve written that I’d like to put out and I hope
that I can develop a fiction voice that people recognize and appreciate.

How did you come up with the title?

My novel is the story of a minister who sees a young man and initially confuses him for an angel, although society would view him
as anything but. His relationship with the young man changes everything in his life. So Angel seemed like the best title.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I hope that it presents more questions than answers. I would like people to read it, think about the story, and let it speak to them in
a personal way. The message will depend a great deal on the reader, as it should be.

How much of the book is realistic?

It is all realistic. It’s a story about two men and their relationship. It is set in a church community. No aliens or vampires
anywhere.

Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

I drew on my experience working in a church to make the setting realistic, but it is not autobiographical in any way.

What books have most influenced your life most?

When I was in high school I had to read everything by Douglas Adams. In my early twenties I had to read everything by Milan Kundera. Now
I’m reading a lot of poetry and theology.

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I didn’t have to choose. It was my father.

What book are you reading now?
The Big Red Book by Rumi.

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I have been reading a lot of really old stuff. If I haven’t read it yet, it’s new to me.

What are your current projects?

I’m seeking a new fiction agent for a novel which I actually wrote before Angel and which I recently updated and revised. I’ve finished
a sequel to Angel, but that book really has to sell a bit more to make it worth publishing. I’m waiting for the non-fiction book I finished
this summer with Reader’s Digest to come out and there are a couple of follow up projects that might spring from that. I am also working on
a more theological project. So there are a lot of directions. I have a lot of literary egg baskets.

Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Not surprising for a writer, but I am a solitary character by nature. One time I did have a strong community in which I was highly active
was when I lived in New York and volunteered for the Guthrie Center. (Folksinger Arlo Guthrie’s non-profit.) Since I came back to Michigan
in 2004, I’ve become much more focused on writing, and much more of a loner.

Do you see writing as a career?

It is a calling, which is a bit different from a career, but it can be a career. Don’t get me wrong, I use “calling” in a matter-of-fact
way. I don’t think there is anything special about having one. Every career has a certain aspect of that. When someone gets laid off from
any job, he has a bit of an existential crisis. There are some fields of endeavor which are skewed much more that way. A person would do
them whether he got paid or not because not doing it would be unimaginable. If you would not feel that you were you if you didn’t
write, that’s what I mean by calling. This is an area where Angel has a touch of autobiography because one aspect of the story is this issue
of having one’s calling threatened. Writers face that all the time. Is it a career if I’m not being paid? If I can’t make a living doing
what I love am I a failure? Am I not who I think I am? Paul, the protagonist of Angel, talks about the downside of having a calling.
If you believe you know what you are supposed to do, you question your ability to do it well enough. He wonders whether people are so
imperfect that they are doomed to fail God either by failing to know what their calling is or by thinking they know and not doing it as
well as they would like. So that is what I mean by calling. My sense of self and my career are tied to each other in a way that might be
unhealthy, but what can I do? If it is unhealthy, I hope I do not get well, because I like who I am. Doing writing as my career was always
important to me. Some people are happy to make their money another way. That’s probably smart. It’s a choice.

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No. I wrote it over the course of a decade and revised and revised and revised. I am happy with the final version. If it had not been
published, I would probably still be fiddling with it, but there is a point when you’re done and you have to stop re-thinking it.

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

blurb:

Since the loss of his lively, charming wife to cancer six years ago, minister Paul Tobit has been operating on autopilot, performing his
religious duties by rote. Everything changes the day he enters the church lobby and encounters a radiant, luminous being lit from behind,
breathtakingly beautiful and glowing with life. An angel. For a moment Paul is so moved by his vision that he is tempted to fall on his knees
and pray.

Even after he regains his focus and realizes he simply met a flesh-and-blood young man, Paul cannot shake his sense of awe and
wonder. He feels an instant and overwhelming attraction for the young man, which puzzles him even as it fills his thoughts and fires his
feelings. Paul has no doubt that God has spoken to him through this vision, and Paul must determine what God is calling him to do.

Thus begins a journey that will inspire Paul’s ministry but put him at odds with his church as he is forced to examine his deeply held
beliefs and assumptions about himself, his community, and the nature of love.

Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

One of the challenges is to resist the urge to make characters more articulate than they would be in life. As a writer you can find just
the right words to express an emotion, but your characters are not professional writers. So sometimes you have to “ugly up” the perfect
expression of something because it just wouldn’t be realistic for, say, a 24- year old recovering alcoholic to speak in poetry.

Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I am an eclectic reader. There is not one writer that I am focused on at the moment.

Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No, but I am on tour five months out of the year with my ballet project.

Who designed the covers?

The cover artist of Angel was Anne Cain based on a concept I proposed.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The novel evolved out of a trip I took in 2000 to Mount Rainier in Seattle. I took a bus tour and the driver was entertaining and kept
talking about burning out on his old job. Toward the end of the tour, someone asked what his old job had been and he said “a minister.”
There were a number of things that stayed with me about that, which I thought would make a great novel. The fact that Mount Rainier was
beautiful and a dormant volcano, and the idea of someone who burned out on the ministry to become a mountain guide. I was reading a lot
of Eastern thought at the time, and it seemed to me that there could be a great story about someone having some kind of life change, maybe
a crisis of faith, or a new direction, that put him on a course that would separate him from his congregation. It would “breathe” the
beauty of the mountain, show how he was called to both. I didn’t know what the “thing” would be though, that separated the minister from the
church and brought him to the mountain. I had a feel for what itwould be, but no specifics. I spent the better part of a decade
meditating on it and trying different things. When the “thing” came to me– that he would fall in love with a man– everything fell into
place and I wrote it quickly as if a tap had been turned on. I just had to catch the water.

Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I became quite interested in the Bible as a result of imagining the inner life of a Christian minister.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

The main thing is not to rush it. When I first decided I wanted to be a writer, I felt pressed to write a novel and I rushed to get one
on paper and it was terrible. You have to do a lot of bad writing, and you need the patience to let an idea lay fallow for a while, maybe
for years. A professional photographer once told me that the key to taking memorable photos was just to take tons of pictures and most of
them won’t be good and a few will be brilliant. I write like mad. I don’t throw anything away. Eventually some of the stuff that I thought was trash turns out to have gems in it. The longer I work at it, the more automatic the process becomes and the better the
gem-to-trash ratio gets. So the advice is that everything takes much longer than you wold like it to. You need the patience of Job.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Angel gets slapped with a lot of genre labels, and some of them scare off certain readers. Don’t be put off by the idea of a “gay Christian
romance.” It is something other than that, and I hope you will give the book a try and decide what animal it is for yourself.

Name of Author: Laura Lee
Name of Book: Angel
Author Website: angelthenovel.com
Amazon Link
http://www.amazon.com/Angel-Laura-Lee/dp/161372103X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1353081837&sr=8-2&keywords=angel+laura+lee
Twitter Link: @LauraLeeAuthor

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Motown Writers Network Platinum Sponsor~ Sylvia McClain

The Motown Writers Network is pleased to introduce you to the 2012 Essence of Motown Literary Jam & Conference Platinum sponsor. We thank you Sylvia for being a continued supporter of the Motown Writer’s Network and the annual conference.

Sylvia McClain is currently a contributing writer for Equal Opportunity Publications.  She also writes for The Michigan Journal published by the University of Michigan-Dearborn.  She has written articles for the magazines Braids World and Strut to name a few.  She conducts workshops on money management, self-publishing, and freelance writing.

An author of a memoir titled Skipping Through Life: The Reason I Am; Ms. McClain has a new book titled The Write Life: A Beginning Writer’s Guide to Writing, Money Management, Publishing and Marketing.  She formerly wrote a weekly column, “Sylvia Speaks” for the Dearborn Press and Guide.  She has been featured in The Writer’s Digest on-line “Speak Out” section as well as WD’s 2003 Writer’s Yearbook extra.   Ms. McClain has been a guest columnist and a contributing writer for the Michigan Chronicle, was regularly quoted in The Detroit Free Press and Detroit News as a subject matter expert.  She has written features stories published by The University of Michigan-Dearborn in the university’s Lyceum.  Please visit her web site at www.scribalpress.com

She is a former board member of The Detroit Writer’s Guild, responsible for the recording of financial data.  Ms. McClain has been on the board of Project Sis (a nonprofit organization for teens at risk) and the city of Detroit’s Cluster Seven of Detroit’s Community Reinvestment Strategy Process. Her other volunteer work has been with WTVS Public TV volunteer staff for fourteen years, a supervisor with Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) for six years, and the Better Business Bureau as an arbitrator during the 1980’s.  She was previously employed 22 years with Comerica Incorporated as a Data Base Analyst in the Economics Department.

Ms. McClain is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Teaching while holding a Bachelor of General Studies: Art History, Communications, English, degree from the University of Michigan-Dearborn.  She holds an Associate of Arts degree in Accounting from Wayne County Community College.

Ms. McClain is single and has one child.  She lives in Dearborn.

Q&A with Sylvia…

Tell us your latest news

Two of the books I was working on are now done. Currently my editor and I are trying to work out a schedule to go over every page.

When and why did you begin writing?

My writing began in the fourth grade, when I wrote a play called Trapped in a Cave and it was selected to be performed at my elementary school. My fourth grade teacher wanted everyone to know that they all could write.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In 1997 when I acquire a column at UM-D

What inspired you to write your first book?

I wanted to let everyone know that one life is not always perfect.

Do you have a specific writing style?

Non-fiction only nothing else

How did you come up with the title?

Don’t really remember. I just wanted the title to be simple and telling my stories in vignettes was simpler. Which meant the title should be simple too.

How much of the book is realistic?

All of it, it all happen to me in my book, Skipping Through Life, The Reason I Am

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Marvin Arnett who wrote the forward in my autobiography

Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Larry Crider

Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely, I do not have to have a job anymore because I am considered disabled

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I am always looking for updates

Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Selling the books

Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

Carolyn Howard-Johnson, The Frugal Book Promoter

Who designed the covers?

Me

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Making sure things make sense as it is read

Books:

More Hops, Skips and Jumps (coming out soon)

Skipping Through Life, The Reason I Am

The Write Life

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author Website: http://www.sylviaspeaks.blogspot.com/

Publisher’s Website: http://www.scribalpress.com/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ScribalPress

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sylvia.mcclain

AFFILIATIONS:

AMERICAN BUSINESS WOMEN ASSOCIATION (ABWA)

LAKE SHORE, LAKE SHORE CHAPTER

CAREER NETWORK MEMBER, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FEMALE EXECUTIVES

NATIONAL WRITERS UNION

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Tip on Book Writing & Research from Dan Poynter

 

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Michigan Literary Network News is out! Edition of Monday, Apr. 02, 2012

Michigan Literary Network News
Monday, Apr. 02, 2012
HEADLINE

Rasco From RIF » NONFICTION MONDAY ROUNDUP, HERE IT IS!

April 1st, 2012 I am delighted to host the Monday, April 2, 2012 Nonfiction Monday Roundup.  Please add your name and book title along with the URL of your entry in the comment section, I will be c…
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Arielle Eckstut Interview — Why Author Platform is Essential (Part 1/3)

 

 

Kai Mann

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Scheduling Your Book Project via @bloggingauthors

Expert Author Irene Watson

“Where will I ever find the time to write my book?” or simply, “How long does it take to write a book?” is a good question authors often ask themselves. The first-time author may feel overwhelmed just trying to decide where to begin, and even the seasoned author can find beginning each new book to be a challenge.

First of all, let me say that I know hardly any author who has not found that writing a book ends up taking a lot longer than was initially planned, but I also know that few things can leave a person with such a sense of accomplishment as writing a book. However long the writing and production take, it will be worth it if you spend the time being serious about the process, you allow yourself to be inspired, and you produce a quality product in the end.

To make what feels overwhelming seem more manageable, we can break down writing and producing a book into a series of steps that give an idea of the order and time needed for each step in the process.

Come Up with an Idea (a few minutes to a few years): Coming up with a good idea for a book is easier said than done. Usually good ideas just come to us rather than our going out looking for them. But even after you have the idea, you need to refine it. You’ll want to play around with it for several days, weeks, or even months. Look around for books that might have similar ideas. Read them so you can see whether your idea has been done before or you have something new you can say on the topic. Be sure not to steal ideas from other authors; you don’t want to plagiarize, but you can cite other sources in your book.

Research (one month to a few years): Even if you are going to write a novel, you will find aspects of research you will need to do. Sometimes the research is just simple fact-checking. For example, if your novel is set in Atlanta, it might just require double-checking the name of a restaurant or a street for accuracy in your book. If you’re writing a non-fiction book, it might require months of research to assemble your information. In my opinion, research is often the most exciting part of writing the book. It’s when you gather and discover new information, which can cause your idea to expand and change, become stronger and more refined. Let yourself go crazy with the research and read everything on the topic that you can. Take notes and make sure you write down the sources for all your notes-the authors, books, page numbers, etc. Look at some other nonfiction books to see how they are arranged with notes, footnotes, and bibliography pages. You will want to use “The Chicago Manual of Style” or some other style manual to make sure you incorporate your research properly into your book.

Write the Book (weeks to years): According to a study done by the Brenner Information Group, it takes 475 hours to write a fiction book and 725 to write a nonfiction book. Of course, those numbers are averages. It depends on how long you want your book to be, what your topic is, and what your goals are. If you’re writing a long scholarly work, it’s going to take longer than it does to write a thirty-two page children’s book, although both will be time-consuming. I’m sure many of you are thinking, “Where am I going to find 475 hours?” Truthfully, it’s not that hard to find. I’m a firm believer in “steady wins the race.” I frequently tell people that if they just write a page a day, they will have written a book by the end of the year. If you can find just an hour a day, or even half an hour, you can do it. If you can block out two or three hours every Sunday, you can do it. And besides, writing a book is not a race. It’s more important that you take your time and create a quality product than that you rush it.

Revising the Book (days to months): Again, the amount of time needed for revision depends on the book. I should point out that none of the steps in this process to this point have to be done in specific order. You might start writing your book, realize you have to stop and do some research, then go back to writing, then realize you need to do some more research, which could mean finding out something new that causes you to go back and revise what you have already written before you go on to write the next part. It’s a constant back and forth process when you write a book, and you will find yourself revising as you go. You might get frustrated that writing is not really a linear process, but try to enjoy the process anyway and realize that however long it takes, you are getting closer to your goal. The main thing is that once you have a complete rough draft, you sit down and revise the entire book. That means more than proofreading. It means seeing the big picture, making sure the book is organized properly, that the arguments make sense, that the sentences flow, that there are no inconsistencies, and looking for places where you may need to remove something that is irrelevant, or expand something that needs more explanation.

Editing (two weeks to two months): I have editor friends who complain that every author thinks the editor can start working on the book the day the author calls. Editing a book can actually be time-consuming; the editor will usually go through the book several times and send the book back to the author with revision suggestions. It usually takes several weeks to do an editing job, so authors should schedule plenty of time for the editing and for doing more of their own revisions. Don’t put the cart before the horse and plan your book signing for one month after you send the editor the book. Wait until you know the books are being printed. Plan for the worst case scenario-that the editor will discover a lot of work still needs to be done on the book. Call the editor a few weeks before you finish writing the book so he or she knows the book is coming and can plan accordingly so you don’t have to wait weeks for the editor to get to it.

Proofreading (one to two weeks): If you and your editor have done a good job, the proofreader should not take too long on the book, but again, your book is not the only one the proofreader has to proofread so plan to give yourself plenty of time.

Cover Design and Layout (one week to one month): A cover design can take little or a lot of time, depending on whether you have artwork or a photograph you want to use for your cover or you need to hire an artist to create a cover for you. Be thinking about your cover as you work on your book so you’re prepared for this step. As for layout of the book, if you’ve written a short novel with no pictures, the layout person might be able to have it done in a day or two (but again, remember you are not the layout person’s only customer). If your book has a lot of graphics, charts, or photographs, it could be weeks or even months before the layout is done. Remember, you will need to look over the proofs to make sure photographs are in the right places, and there are no typos. However, now is not the time to rewrite sentences or paragraphs. Only minor changes should be made at this point. Anything major should have been caught before the book went to the proofreader, and the layout person is likely to charge you extra for any corrections.

Printing (four to six weeks): Four to six weeks is standard for the printing. You will be sent a paper proof copy (different from the pdf file the layout person previously sent you), and a copy of the cover to look over and approve. Again, any corrections needed will slow down the process and the printer will charge you for changes. The four to six weeks should include the shipment of the books to your door.

Pre-Marketing (four to six weeks): If you haven’t started already, then while the book is at the printer is the time to begin marketing your book. It’s when you can build your website, make up your business cards, brochures, fliers, and arrange for placement in stores and to hold book signings. Be cautious here-if your book is supposed to arrive on March 20th, don’t schedule your book signing for March 21st, only to end up with the books not coming until March 22nd. Plan your book signing for a few weeks after the books arrive so you have time to get them in local stores and to list them at online stores. Then you will feel prepared when the truck with all those books shows up at your door. Make sure you have cleared a place to put all those books!

While writing your book, you will experience hang-ups, frustrations, and moments of triumph, all of which may alter your schedule, but if you plan it out, you should be able to produce a book in the given timeframe above for each step. At the very least, plan for writing and production to take you a year. It will probably take you two. But we all know how fast time passes-so you will have that book in hand before you know it, and then you will feel that all that hard work was well worth it.

Irene Watson is the Managing Editor of Reader Views, where avid readers can find reviews of recently published books as well as read interviews with authors. Her team also provides author publicity and a variety of other services specific to writing and publishing books.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Irene_Watson

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How to Self-Publish a Book

 

 

 

 

Kai Mann

https://kai-mann.com

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Call for Metro Detroit Community Groups & Authors With Purpose. Would like presentations 4August Meet & Greet

Essence of Motown Literary Meet and Greet is geared to kick off our conference season in an effort to raise funds and register people for the conference.

Motown Writers | Join4Free

In August, we dedicate our usual writers discussion at Barnes and Nobles readers writers & community to come together in an effort to increase awareness for the needs in Metro Detroit.

We invite non profits, libraries and authors with purpose to come out to speak about their project and network with the local literary community. For people with events this will be your chance to commune and speak with leaders in the literary community, meet local authors and display your fliers and materials on our promotional table.

For us, we hope you come with donations for our conference. We are hoping this year to making our writing portion free through grants, but we still need location fees, lunch sponsorships, tables fees and so forth so we use the Meet and Greet as our initial fund raiser.

This year, there will be only five author slots available. Payment for these slots will consists of 5 books by the author and $20 dollars.

Schedule of Events will include:

MEETING local authors

NETWORKING with local community leaders

GIVING to help strengthen the Metro Detroit literary community

WINNING books, e-reading devices & more!

REGISTER/RSVP NOW

Participant

First 50 participants registered will receive a CD filled with quick reads! Register now!!!

Register for The Motown Literary Meet & Greet - August 2011 in Detroit, MI  on Eventbrite

Community Leader/Author with Purpose
b4 registering, please send an email to motownwriters@yahoo.com with a presentation proposal

Register for The Motown Literary Meet & Greet - August 2011 in Detroit, MI  on Eventbrite

Author Vendor – see below
Your book MUST be ordered thru B&N. You must arrange to have them order the book no later than Aug 1st to have them available in the store. Call (313) 577-2436. You MUST donate 5 books to MWN (for later giveaways)

Register for The Motown Literary Meet & Greet - August 2011 in Detroit, MI  on Eventbrite

Excerpt Promo for Readers
Authors get a chance 4yr work to be seen in front of Metro Detroit Readers. Submit a pdf with the cover, bio for author, copyright statement and maximum of three chapters to motownwriters@yahoo.com

Register for The Motown Literary Meet & Greet - August 2011 in Detroit, MI  on Eventbrite
If you would like to give other promotional material please send to:

Sylvia Hubbard

c/o Motown Writers Network

PO Box 43439

Detroit, MI 48243

REGISTER/RSVP AT: http://motownlitmeetgreet2011.eventbrite.com/
Register for The Motown Literary Meet & Greet - August 2011 in Detroit, MI  on Eventbrite

See previous videos from Meet & Greet

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WCCCD Spring Book Festival 4/9/11 Northwest Campus

WCCCD Spring Book Festival 4/9/11 Northwest Campus.

 

Please check out this post by Versandra Kennebrew!

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