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MWN Author Spotlight with Eric B. Willis @EricBWillis


EBWillis
Today, the Motown Writers Network is putting author Eric B. Willis in the spotlight.

Where are you from?

I was born and raised in Detroit. I now live in Waterford, Michigan.

Tell us your latest news?

I’m currently involved with two family history writing book projects and a third one that’s waiting in the wings. My goal is to publish my second book towards the end of the year. Also in July, I will be attending a Willis family reunion in Hampton, Virginia and looking forward to sharing and receiving feedback about my current book.
When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing as a child. However, around 1997, it was reignited shortly after I began researching my family history. It was my desire to leave a legacy–to share the information that I’ve discovered about my family history–about their triumphs and tragedies, and how their survival in America continued to exist despite their tremendous odds as a black race of people with African, European, Indian and Asian ancestry.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

After I began writing about my family history and black history.

What inspired you to write your first book?

I didn’t know much about my Mississippi paternal lineage–my heritage. Also, there was an oral family historical account that was passed down about two brothers from France who traveled to this country, but I wanted to know more.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I used all four writing styles in my book–primarily expository, narrative, descriptive, and persuasive to a smaller extent.
How did you come up with the title?

The first part of the name The Willis Handbook came about over twenty years ago during a non-related discussion at a Willis family function–which was before I became a genealogist and began writing the book. The second part of the name relates to intersecting related memoirs and historical events into a family’s genealogy or a person’s biography in order to assist with reconstructing their lives and to produce more of a connection with my readers. Also, adding photographs, historical records, pedigree charts, and maps helps me to achieve this goal as well.

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

I want to encourage people of all ethnicities to become family historians and writers. Afterward, they would be able to reach out and teach their current and future generations that many of their ancestors and relatives–being aware or unaware of God’s presence and guidance–did experience many successes in the midst of their sacrifices and failures.

How much of the book is realistic?

The non-fiction book not only chronicles 168 years of my family history, but it also includes related and extensive information about African American and American History–covering such events as the American Civil War, early Black communities and educational institutions, medical histories and epidemics, the Civil Rights Movement, etc. Its use is also a genealogical and scholarly reference source. It’s like a treasured heirloom meets an encyclopedia.

Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Yes to both. The work details many experiences in my life, my family and other black family lives, and the lives of those who have had major influences–directly or indirectly–and from a local, state or national perspective.

What books have most influenced your life most?

Besides the Bible which also includes an extensive genealogical record, books that are inspirational and history-related.

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

It would be a challenge to just narrow it down to one writer. So, I would have to choose Alex Haley, John Hope Franklin, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Darlene C. Dickson–my first writer’s group instructor.

What book are you reading now?

Grace of Silence: A Memoir by the National Public Radio (NPR) journalist Michelle Norris. It’s about her family’s complex legacy and understanding those who reared us.
Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I’m interested in reading Allyson Hobb’s book A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life as a part of my research for my current writing project.
What are your current projects?

I have two active writing projects– a book about my maternal cousin who was involved with racial passing–living his life as a white Jewish man and a family history about my maternal lineage. I’m also assisting a client with writing and publishing his family history.

Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

The Detroit Public Library’s Burton Historical Collection staff was very helpful to me early on in my research.
Do you see writing as a career?

Yes, I do–in addition to being a genealogist, an artist, and an occasional actor.
If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

That’s a good question, but I would not change anything.
Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

As a child in elementary school, around the forth grade, I was given an assignment to create a hardcover children’s story book with illustrations. It was about a boy’s involvement with various sports. I remembered the covers being made of cardboard and wrapped in a vinyl sheet material with a sport-like pattern.

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

My second non-fiction book begins with my genealogical quest to uncover the truth behind my maternal great grandfather’s birth in the segregated town of Huntsville, Alabama during the late-19th century. His mother is black but his father is white. However, along the way, I discovered a cousin who was involved in racial passing. As a result, my goal is to take the reader on a journey through an array of notable jazz musicians, the religion of Judaism, American union leader Jimmy Hoffa, renowned entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr., and a discussion of race.
Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

I really love the research phase of the writing process, but it can be very time consuming–reviewing documentation and artifacts, reading, interviewing and traveling.
Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I actually have two favorite authors–John Hope Franklin and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Being a descendant from families with deep southern roots and my interest in history, I enjoy reading the works of these noted American historians, educators, and authors of southern history and racial politics.

 

Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

As a genealogist and writer, I have to travel to various locations to research and obtain non-digitized information that’s not available via the Internet. I enjoy pouring through old photo albums, records at court houses, libraries, etc. If possible, I prefer to travel and conduct face-to-face interviews for gathering information for the book.

 

Who designed the covers?

I’m an artist as well, so I designed my book’s covers.
What was the hardest part of writing your book?

From a sentimental perspective, having to remove the last chapter because the size of the book had surpassed 900 pages. The chapter consists of information I’ve accumulated over the years during my genealogical research of my Willis family and during the time of the book’s completion, I was not able to establish to my satisfaction the people represented therein were related to my family. However, there is a possibility that there may be some Willis familial connections, but additional evidence is required.
Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

Besides the wealth of information about my family history and my culture’s history, I’ve learned about the existence of so many other family members across the country–what a blessing.

 

Also, consistently dedicating some time each day towards the project kept me engaged which eventually led to its completion after ten years. Some of the days consisted of one to several hours of researching (which took on various forms), writing or both. A mixture of researching, writing and sharing contributed to my excitement level.

 

Do you have any advice for other writers?

My advice is to devote at least a half an hour to the writing process even if it’s involving researching for material. Research other successful authors within your genre to determine what contributed to their success while also maintaining your own sense of writing style. Connect (in person or online) with informative writer workshops in your region. In reference to researching and writing your family history, begin with interviewing your older relatives first because once they make that transition–that valuable information may be forever lost.
Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers? I truly appreciate your support. Also, I believe it’s important for us to know and share our family histories–to maintain that connection with our past, present, and future generations–and to learn from the past, live in the present, and build for the future. To know our heritage is like a tree with roots.
 

whbfrontcover

  • Name of Author: Eric B. Willis
  • Name of Book: The Willis Handbook: An Intersection of Genealogy, Memoirs and History of a Black American Family – 1835-2003

 

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#MichLit Events this week… got one? Let me know… #motownlit #Detroit #Michigan #amwriting #amreading Plz Share

I was on Facebook and saw there were a lot of literary events that needed to be talked about. I know there are some that are actually not on Facebook or don’t see what I see when you log in, so I decided to create a post about it.

 

8/11/15

#MichLit  #Event 8/11/15 @ 7pm Springfed Writers Contest Winners Read in Birmingham http://ow.ly/QMCmQ #literacy #writing #michigan

 

8/12/15

 

8/12, 5:30p ET, w guest . Listen live online and comment or call in and listen in 646-915-9177.

 

 

 

 

 

Finance and the Artist – Free financial workshop

Tomorrowat 8/12/15 6:30pm – 8:30pm
Tomorrow · 76°F / 59°F Partly Cloudy

Oakland Avenue Missionary Baptist Church
309 Harper Ave, Detroit, Michigan 48202
https://www.facebook.com/events/118043958531905/

Crystal Reign Brock invited you

 

“Reading Room” Ice Cream Social

https://www.facebook.com/events/571412659664540/

 

8/13/15

 

Author Visit: Anna Clark

Anna Clark invited you

https://www.facebook.com/events/562892097184724/

 

8/16/15

 

3rd ANNUAL POETRY WORKSHOP AND SCHOOL SUPPLY DRIVE

Rosemarie Wilson invited you

https://www.facebook.com/events/1471471069817011/

 

 

Also if you are signing up for NanowriMo, please let me know in the comments after you have signed up.

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Those Red Pumps May Have To Wait~ Featured Article

Those Red Pumps May Have To Wait

By Mary Delia Eatmon

So what if you can’t keep up with the latest dress styles or wear those red bottom shoes that seem to keep calling your name. Right now your main focus is to remember that this too shall pass. This time with your children is precious and it should be used wisely to pour in some much-needed knowledge into your children. Before you know it, time will have passed and you will be able to look back and be glad that you made these little sacrifices. The memories that you are making now will allow you to learn about yourself as you teach them about life and how they will fit in it. Think about it for a moment, this is the time that you will tap into your own creativity while demonstrating the different good and bad things life has to offer. For now, just enjoy each moment you have because time is fleeting. It’s the simple things that you manage that will make you who you are.  You gain strength, confidence, and wisdom by what you are doing now in your life. So, while you are raising you babies raise the inner you.  Save yourself from the unnecessary stress that presents itself on a daily basis and stop looking at the mother down the street that seems to have it all.

As a young mother of 8, I learned quickly to accept the role of motherhood. And over the past 70 years I’ve witnessed, as well as experienced first hand, that we innately have the ability to nurture. But on the other hand, to be a mother (to birth, raise, and display appropriate affection) it is a learned process. Now, if you are like I was, and started off having several babies early, you’ll need to pull on a little hidden trait called patience: and you will have to practice it often. Coupled with persistence you will get the hang of this thing called motherhood. Things will fall into place over time as you naturally do what needs to be done. In this fast pace of today’s living, before you know it, you’ll turn around and your little ones will be all grown up and out the door.

We have all heard of the empty nest syndrome. The repercussions are real and when it happens it’s a real shocker. So, it would behoove all young mothers to value this time and make the sacrifice of spending as much time as possible with your loved ones while they are young and yours. It will really pay off in the long run. I can safely say this, don’t worry they will let you know later if you’ve done a good job or not
. Make life, for yourself, as enjoyable as possible. When you’ve secured your own foundation, your children will benefit.

Here’s a little tidbit of info that supports the benefits of being a great mom. Back in the early 1900’s a woman named Anna M. Jarvis, out of Grafton West, Virginia, honored her mother Ann Reeves Jarvis’ who died May 2, 1905 by celebrating mothers everywhere. Anna continued the task that her mother started and successfully marked the 2nd Sunday in May of 1908 as Mother’s Day at Andrew’s Church in Philadelphia.  Today, we all are acknowledged and celebrated because of one woman’s child decision to remember her loving mother.

When Ann originally drafted this task she highlighted the virtues of what a good mother is by pointing out that such a woman is a blessing and her love is never exhausted; She makes endless sacrifices no matter what the obstacles are; She works tirelessly to take care of her children and her home; and she loves deeply. Mothers know the personality of each of her children and generally do not compare one child against the other. She simply loves each child for who they are.

There are women who may not be a biological mother; but instead they were thrust into the role of motherhood. There may be adopted mothers, grandmothers, or stepmothers with the same instinct and all the attributes of a biological mother. If you are a mother good or bad you must remember that it’s a learned process. But if you are in need of a mother, you don’t always have to look far. These women are usually right by your side. Who knows…she may even be your teacher. Granted there are a lot of rotten mothers out there; but if given the chance, along with their own desire, they too can become sweet.

It takes love; passion; patience; a lot of sacrifices; as well as wisdom to accept what your role is as a mother. 
 Through the grace of God every woman bearing a child can rejoice in the fact that the base of her heart is a manifestation of divine mercy.  It is a privilege to be able to produce a child for the glory of God.

Mary Eatmon II

Mary Delia Eatmon, 84yr.

Author of Nine Houses

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MWN Author Spotlight ~ Linda Anger @TWCinMI

This week’s MWN Spotlight is on Linda C. Anger!

Linda C. Anger has lived and worked in metro Detroit, Michigan all her life. Her poetry and fiction has been published nationally in venues such as “Mused: The Bella Online Journal,” “Still Crazy Literary Magazine,” and “Almost Touching: A reader for women and men.”

Linda is the president and owner of The Write Concept, Inc., a marketing communications company founded in 2000. Her corporate clients have included DaimlerChrysler Corporation, HAVEN, The Royal Park Hotel, The Community Foundation of Greater Rochester, and Demp Coaching. Business articles have been published in Black Engineer Magazine, Profiles in Diversity Journal, and MultiCultural Law Journal. Visit http://www.thewriteconcept.com

Learn more about her creative work and publications at www.fullcrumbcafe.com

Where are you from?

I was born at Mt. Carmel Mercy Hospital in Detroit, grew up in Orchard Lake, and have lived in the Rochester area most of my adult life.

 

Tell us your latest news?

My book “Sweeping the Floors in the Full Crumb Cafe,” which is a collection of poems, stories, and essays, has a modest following. I am working on a self-help book based on a blog I kept over the course of a year of chemotherapy. I am just completing two years as president of Detroit Working Writers, and will step into the presidency of Toastmasters Walsh College Troy in July.

 

When and why did you begin writing?

I was nine years old, was taunted by the other kids because of a physical issue, withdrew, and turned to books and notebooks as an escape.

 

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When I was nine, I realized how much I loved to read and tell stories. That’s when I decided to be a writer, and once I made that decision, I was one.

 

What inspired you to write your first book?

Poetry was my initial genre, and was my focus until about five years ago, when I began to write short fiction pieces. Poetry came from daily existence. Stories came when I was mature enough to understand different aspects of life.

 

Do you have a specific writing style?

People tell me I have a strong voice. I only know that I speak / write my mind.

 

How did you come up with the title?

“Sweeping the Floors in the Full Crumb Cafe” – in what became the introduction to this volume, I wrote about the “teeter-totter” of life, and fulcrum on which it totters or rests. This brain of mine turned it into a metaphorical place, which became the Full Crumb Cafe.  “Sweeping the Floors” is the first in what I intend to be a series of Full Crumb Cafe books.

 

Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

Every poem or story I write has a message.

 

How much of the book is realistic?

The poems are based on my life or my realizations about life. The stories sometimes are based on a real person or experience.

 

Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

See question above.

 

What books have most influenced your life most?

Too many to list here!  Anything by Anaȉs Nin, Hermann Hesse, Napoleon Hill

 

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Hermann Hesse and Anaȉs Nin

 

What book are you reading now?

“The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern – for the 4th time

“White House Ghosts” – about the relationships between the US Presidents and their speech writers

“Mrs. Poe” – a novel based on the story of Edgar Allen Poe & his mistress

 

What are your current projects?

The self-help book is my focus as I wish it to be completed and published by spring 2016, but I continue to write poetry and personal essays.

 

Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Detroit Working Writers

 

Do you see writing as a career?

Yes. I have made a living as a copy writer for over 15 years.

 

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

No

 

Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

See question #3

 

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

I can, yes.

 

Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Time is always an issue. Because I spend my workdays writing for other people, it is sometimes difficult to switch off my business brain and give my creative brain free rein.

 

Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

I have many favorites, as noted in the earlier question. What I love about Nin is the sensuality of her work. The woman can describe a leaf in such a way that it becomes erotic.  Hesse’s work is heavily spiritual, and Hill’s work is serious and practical. Morgenstern (The Night Circus) has an ebb and flow that is remarkable – this is the book I wish I had written!
Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

No

 

Who designed the covers?

I did. My business is marketing communications; I am trained as a book compositor (layout and typography), and graphic design.

 

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

See the question above about challenges

 

Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

In addition to producing my own book, I have ghostwritten or edited quite a few others. I learn something about content development, layout, and production from each project.

 

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Don’t give up, and don’t ever think your first draft is your finished draft. Write each scene from at least three different perspectives and find the one that drives the story forward.

 

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

One of my writing champions, Margo Lagatutta, used to say, “How can I know what I think until I see what I say?”  I write, partially, to understand what goes on at the depths of me. If the things I learn or struggle with have meaning to you, I am honored.

Full Crumb Cake

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Michigan Literary Network

The Motown Literary Network has been live on blogtalkradio.com since fall of 2009, with nearly 10,000 downloads. Our 30 minute, weekly show airs Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. EST with a focus on everything related to the literary world, from the writing process to author highlights to the nuts and bolts of publishing. Although the show can be heard by listeners all over the world, and our guests may come from all over the country, our target audience is readers and writers in Michigan with an interest in the Michigan literary community. Established in 2000, Motown Writers Network and The Michigan Literary Network were created to strengthen Michigan’s Literary Community. Drawing readers, writers, authors, poets and more together, the networks’ mission is to connect readers to Michigan literary works, educate and connect writers and poets to resources, provide events and venues for authors to showcase their work and a lot more. To sign up for updates on The Michigan Literary Network, click here. Visit our website and help strengthen the Michigan Literary Network, by sending our information to other readers and writers!

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Motown Literary Network

The Motown Literary Network has been live on blogtalkradio.com since fall of 2009, with nearly 10,000 downloads. Our 30 minute, weekly show airs Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. EST with a focus on everything related to the literary world, from the writing process to author highlights to the nuts and bolts of publishing. Although the show can be heard by listeners all over the world, and our guests may come from all over the country, our target audience is readers and writers in Michigan with an interest in the Michigan literary community. Established in 2000, Motown Writers Network and The Michigan Literary Network were created to strengthen Michigan’s Literary Community. Drawing readers, writers, authors, poets and more together, the networks’ mission is to connect readers to Michigan literary works, educate and connect writers and poets to resources, provide events and venues for authors to showcase their work and a lot more. To sign up for updates on The Michigan Literary Network, click here. Visit our website and help strengthen the Michigan Literary Network, by sending our information to other readers and writers!

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Motown Writers Network Author Spotlight ~ Rebecka Vigus

 

Rebecka VigusWhere are you from?

West Branch, Michigan
Tell us your latest news?

The third book in the Macy McVannel series, Sanctuary, is being released Aug.22, 2014
When and why did you begin writing?

I began writing at age ten. A teacher told me with my imaginations I would end up in books. I believed him.
When did you first consider yourself a writer?

In high school, some of my poems were in the school paper, but one of my poems was used by a minister in a sermon.
What inspired you to write your first book?

I had always wanted to write a novel. I became involved with National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). I wrote my first novel in 21 days.
Do you have a specific writing style?

I write easy to read books. Something you can pick up and knock out in about four hours. But, I have no name for my style other than they are mysteries.
How did you come up with the title?

For my first novel, it was set in a small town and in order to arrest the right person, you had to dig through all the secrets in a small town so Secrets was it. For the novel releasing in August, I had to really think about what the book was offering. Sanctuary is ultimately the goal, so hence, the title.
Is there a message in your novel that you want readers to grasp?

In the current novel I am dealing with spousal abuse and how to escape it. There is always a way out, you have to be willing to go for it.
How much of the book is realistic?

I write realistic fiction with a twist. So, this book could happen any place, in any town, in any neighborhood.
Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

Not it this book.
What books have most influenced your life most?

Mysteries. I love trying to figure out who did it before the author reveals it. Agatha Christie, Patricia Cornwell, Phyllis A. Whitney, Mary Higgins Clark, Lee Child, David Baldacci, there are many who keep me fascinated.
If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

William Kent Krueger, I had a chance to do a one day intensive writing session with him.
What book are you reading now?

Stolen, by Daniel Palmer
Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

C Hope Clark. I have read her book The Shy Writer Reborn and her mystery Palmetto Poison. I just received her first novel, Low Country Bribe to read.
What are your current projects?

I am working on a children’s anthology titled Of Moonbeams and Fairy Dust due out the end of November, 2014. I’m also working on the fourth Macy book, Something Borrowed, Something Blue due out in early 2015.
Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Blue Harvest Creative are my design team for my books.
Do you see writing as a career?

Yes. It has been my goal for fifty years. I am finding I am growing a fan base.
If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

Absolutely not.
Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

I remember writing non-sense poetry to start, but I have no one defining moment.
Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Macy McVannel is a police detective who teams up with her college roommate to rescue abused women from their spouses and set them on the path to a new life. This is the third book in the series. The first two were written from Macy’s point-of-view. This one was not written first person, so you get other’s views of Macy.
Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

Making each new book as exciting as or better than the last.
Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about their work?

My current favorite is William Kent Krueger. I love his Corcoran O’Connor character. I love how he submerges you in the landscape of his stories.
Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

Not as much as I’d like to. I prefer to do live signings and book talks. I like getting questions from those who want to write or those who’ve read my books. I want to share my love of writing.
Who designed the covers?

Blue Harvest Creative are my design team. They do internal and external design and set up.
What was the hardest part of writing your book? For me the hardest part is knowing how and where to end it.
Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

I learned even in law the lines are blurred.
Do you have any advice for other writers?

Keep writing. Read all you can about writing, attend a writer’s workshop or conference, but keep writing.
Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Please when you’ve read my books, write a review. Reviews sell books. If you didn’t like it, others want to know. If you did they want to know why.

Sanctuary

Author name: Rebecka Vigus
Book Title: Sanctuary
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MWN Author Spotlight ~ Mary Anne McMahon

 

Mary Anne McMahon

 

This week’s Motown Writers Network spotlight is being shined on Mary Anne McMahon. Mary Anne no longer lives in Detroit; but she regards the Motor City as the place she will ever call home. She is the author of The Motor City and Me: Our Story, a story that tells the remarkable history of Detroit and offers inspiration to the once great American metropolis during its most trying time. Let’s listen in on Mary Anne’s interview so we get to know her better and learn more about her book.

 

Where were you born?

I was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan. I now live in Houston, Texas.

Tell us your latest news?

I have published a book, The Motor City and Me: Our Story, which highlights the rich history of Detroit and how the Motor City has left a lasting impact on my family and me.

When and why did you begin writing?

I have been writing most of my life and have taught writing skills to students for 28 years. After my retirement from education I wrote puppet skits for my puppet performing business, Sassy Celebrations. I then decided to write a book about my beloved hometown.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I have always considered myself a writer.

What inspired you to write your first book?

My book evolved from the acquisition of my ancestral history, my happy Detroit childhood and continual connection to my hometown.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I do not have one specific writing style. In my book I utilize both the expository style and the persuasive style.

How did you come up with the title?

The Motor City and Me: Our Story parallels the rise and fall of Detroit with ups and down in my own life. The title reflects our connection.

Is there a message in your memoir that you want readers to grasp?

I overcame major obstacles in my life. I want to inspire Detroiters to overcome the obstacles facing their city today.

How much of the book is realistic?

My book is non-fiction. The events are real.

Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own life?

The experiences are based on my own life.

What books have most influenced your life most?

Mans Search for Meaning by Victor Frankel had a powerful impact on my life. Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela inspired me as well.

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I would choose John Grogan. His heartwarming book, The Longest Trip Home, about an Irish boy from Detroit resonated with me.  His story inspired me to publish my Detroit memoir.

What book are you reading now?

I am reading I am Malala by Malala Yousafzai.

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I enjoy Malcolm Gladwell’s writing and especially liked his book, David and Goliath.  The insightful novel, The Invention of Wings, drew me to Sue Monk Kidd.

What are your current projects?

I have begun a second book.

Name one entity that you feel supported you outside of family members.

Both professional and non-professional reviewers have given me significant support and encouragement.

Do you see writing as a career?

I want to continue as a writer.

If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything in your latest book?

I made many changes as I wrote the book. So, I am quite satisfied now.

Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

My mother influenced me with her love of literature and writing.

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

Paralleling the rise and fall of Detroit with the ups and downs of my own life, I show readers how Detroit values strengthened and reassured her throughout the difficult times. From the rise and fall of the automotive industry to the city’s recent financial woes, The Motor City and Me strives to take readers on a personal journey through an extraordinary American city. Tracing my family’s Detroit lineage through four generations, my memoirs aims to give readers a thorough look at the city’s history and the indelible mark it has left on me.

Is there anything you find particularly challenging in your writing?

When I wrote my book there were times when thoughts flowed for hours. Other times I had difficulty putting two words together. There was a certain amount of frustration that I had to leave my computer at the “two word” moments.

Who is your favorite author and what is it that really strikes you about his/her work?

I like Ross King. He writes fascinating detailed accounts of engineering marvels and the history that goes with those marvels. I loved his books, Michelangelo and the Pope’s Ceiling and Brunelleschi’s  Dome. 

Do you have to travel much concerning your book(s)?

I did considerable traveling while writing my book. I traveled to my European roots and ancestral homelands.

Who designed the covers?

My publisher designed my cover. I provided the photo.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

The most difficult part was writing about the challenging times in my life.

Did you learn anything from writing your book and what was it?

While I struggled with revealing challenges, I learned afterward that I am not alone. Everyone has challenges.  My book has inspired others to come forward and share the dark moments in their lives.

Do you have any advice for other writers?

Writing is a gift that you give yourself and hopefully to others including future generations.

Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

The conviction, that we can overcome adversity and that failure is not an option, may be a good beginning for renewal.

MaryAnne Motor City and Me

For more information about the author and her book go to:  http://marymcmahonauthor.com/

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Secret Society of Twisted Storytellers Event Presents: Human Spirit Dec. 20th #Detroit #MotownLit

 

Human Spirit Will Showcase at Live Storytelling Event

 

December 20th

 

DETROIT, MI –– The award winning Secret Society of Twisted Storytellers will bring stories of human spirit to the stage at the Charles H. Wright Museum. The popular monthly event is one of winners of the Knight Arts Challenge which funds projects that engage and enrich Detroit through the arts. Satori Shakoor, curator and producer of the event is a recent recipient of the “Spirit of Detroit” Award.

“Events like the Secret Society’s bring out the artist in all of us, helping us to think creatively about our lives and our communities and share the stories that bring people together,” said Dennis Scholl, vice president of arts for Knight Foundation.

“Storytelling is a way for people to learn more about themselves and each other,” says Juanita Moore, president of the Charles H. Wright Museum, which hosts the events. “People coming to these shows experience a feeling of life, growth and excitement through connecting, and that deserves a place to be showcased.”

The Secret Society Of Twisted Storytellers’ next event “Human Spirit” will take place at 8:00 p.m., December 20that The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Radio Host, Coco, Author, Eddie Connor, “Unwrap The Gift In YOU,” High school Wrestler, Emma Kellman, Rochelle Mays and Lula Odom will tell personal stories of great overcoming. Musical guests include jazz artist, Sky Covington and opera singer, Betty Lane with pianist Amy Jackson. Continue reading

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Support #SmallBizSat w/#MotownLit #Detroit Authors 12-5pm

Visit SourceBooksDetroit.com for more information…

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SaveTheDate: Nov 8-9, 2013 Essence of #MotownLit Conf & Jam #Detroit | Give, Write & Network Books! #literary #literacy #michlit

New Front Page

Updated back

The Essence of Motown Literary Jam & Conference

November 8th –9th, 2013

 Various Locations, Detroit, Michigan

www.MotownLiteraryJam.com

* most events are FREE to public

To celebrate the written word in Metro Detroit with every reader and writer around!

Detail Schedule of Events

November 8th, 2013 6pm – 10pm – Free to Public
(donation of 3 or more gently used books encouraged, for our book drive or min $4 for entry)

Location: SOURCE BOOKSELLERS, 4240 Cass Avenue, Ste. 105, Detroit, Michigan 48201

Networking, Poetry Performances, Comedy Show & More!

Hosted by EchoVerse, ReppinTheD &  MotownWriters

All ages can attend

 

November 9th, 2013 8am – 4pm

Location: Julian C. Madison Building LLC
1420 Washington Blvd · Detroit, Michigan

  • 8am Registration for Morning Workshops
  • 8:30 Keynote Speaker
  • 8:50 Workshops (2)
    • Write To Be Read| Write to Finish Facilitator TBA
    • Editing Essentials Facilitator: @TenitaJEditor
  • 9:50 Workshops (2)
    • Getting an Agent or Publisher Facilitator: Karen White Owens
    • Taking Book to Stage Facilitator: Octavia Lesley @detroitwriter71
  • 10:50 Workshops(2)
    • Social Media Made Simple – Stephanie Lewis @23_Exchange
    • 360Digital Publishing Symposium
  • 11:00 Poetry Symposium hosted by Aurora Harris
  • 11:30 Marketplace Opens
  • Noon – VIP Lunch for Morning Workshop Participants with speaker
  • 12:10 2013 Awesome Party Reunion & presentations
  • 12:30 Detroit Cares Presentation
  • 12:40 Too Blessed To Be Depressed Author Panel (Inspirations & Autobiographies)
  • 1:30 All Male Literacy Panel w/Questions & Answers
  • 3:15  Love Shouldn’t Cost A Thing (Romance Genre Panel)
    • Literary Voice Vendor Winner Announced
    • National Writers Union Presentation
  • 3:30 Potpourri of Different (SciFi, Fantasy, Horror, Graphic Novels & Comics)
  • 3:45 Telling A Good Story (Fiction Panel)

3:55 Kindle Winners (Must be present to win)

Mwn2013frtcvr

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Urban Fiction

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WHAT DOES ‘BOOK BEAT’ HAVE IN COMMON WITH THE DIA?

WHAT DOES ‘BOOK BEAT’ HAVE IN COMMON WITH THE DIA?.

via WHAT DOES ‘BOOK BEAT’ HAVE IN COMMON WITH THE DIA?.

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Big news! Big change! frm @LiteraryDetroit Trinosophes, Wed, June 25, 7-9pm. Free & awesome

We’ve got an amazing new location for tomorrow’s big event: storytelling and song with the Rust Belt Rising crew is hitting Trinosophes TOMORROW, Wednesday, June 25, 7-9pm. Free, and awesome. See you there!

Call it good old-fashioned Midwestern storytelling… with a kick.

Nic Esposito of The Head & The Hand Press is hitting the road with Philadelphia musician Todd Henkin from the band The Great Unknown for a series of performance-based storytelling and song showcasing the fascinating stories collected in The Rust Belt Rising Almanac. When this a-typical book talk comes to Detroit, we’re spotlighting Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela’s story on adapting to Detroit through the community in collective housing, as well as a micro-fiction piece about Hitsville, USA, and art inspired by recycled objects from Detroit artist Cindy LaFerle.

The Head & The Hand Press, a craft publisher in Philadelphia, is bringing this show to the city with the support of Literary Detroit.

The Rust Belt Rising Almanac is a collection of snapshots and stories from writers and artists in America’s Rust Belt Cities: escapes, remains, and models of growth. You’ll learn about projects that are working & the people who aren’t, find a road map for wandering, and green your thumb with an industrial soil-strength planting guide. The almanac may not serve strictly as a meteorological or agricultural guide, but it will help to measure the kind of atmospheric pressure felt between jobs, between communities, between the friends who are still here and the ones not so lucky, bound together by a common question: what’s next for the rust belt?

LiteraryDetroit

LiteraryDetroit

@LiteraryDetroit follows you

We are cultivating Detroit as a distinctive literary city with extraordinary public events that connect readers with writers.

Detroit · facebook.com/LiteraryDetroi…

 

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Michigan Literary Network Blogtalk Radio Feature~Kimmie Thomas

Join us today as we feature author Kimmie Thomas on the Michigan Literary Network Blogtalk radio show. She will be talking about her new book Nursing Dr. Miller. Check out her bio below.

Kimmie Thomas

Kimmie Thomas is a native Detroiter. She is a writer, teacher, mother, and wife. Her first love has always been reading and writing. She has been motivated by writers such as Donald Goines, Maya Angelou, Zane and E. Lynn Harris. Kimmie has worked as a psychiatric nurse for more than 10 years. She uses her vast knowledge of mental health to make her characters real for her readers.

This Side of Crazy is her debute novel. She is also featured in an Anthology, Rough and Raw. Check out her latest book, Nursing Dr. Miller. Her current writing project is called House of Assignation.

 

Nursing Dr. MillerBook Description: Do you know what goes on in a hospital? Would you believe that sex, lies and deceit are ever present even while you lay ill in you hospital bed? You may be surprised to find out that the soap operas you watch are not as far fetched as you may think. This story may not be Gray’s Anatomy but it will curl your toes just as much. Gregory Miller, MD is tall dark and handsome. He single and looking for love and the nurses at Kingdom Hospital just want to love him back. Is sex and a good time enough for Dr. Miller? Follow him and his fellow doctors and nurses as they try to find love and a good time while saving lives

 

This side of crazy

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